media & PR

Men and women at work: simple pictures can tell a complex story well

There’s a great example in today’s release of the latest employment figures of the power of simple pictures to communicate complex points.

In this case, it is the use of two pie charts by the Office of National Statistics, pulling together a large number of figures and putting them in a context that is easy to follow:

9 comments
Gulnara Mergenova
Gulnara Mergenova

and how should I understand the fact the statistics service provided the chart of fuull and part time employment where the part time employment is high? but here it can be seen that full time rating is higher...

Anne Fennell
Anne Fennell

Am I inactive? I am raising five sons and easily spend over 20 hrs a week volunteering in local church and school communities and other charitable organisations.

Felicity Fennell
Felicity Fennell

Anne - I know, intimately, how how active you are in the most generous way. Big hug and love xxx

Chris Usher
Chris Usher

As far as Cameron and smugbourne are concerned

Martin Lunnon
Martin Lunnon

Back to the original post - I agree that these are good graphics. I'm particularly pleased that as pie charts they are shown completely flat. The "pie charts on a tilt" that it is so easy to create using Excel (and, I guess, other packages) are far worse at actually transmitting the information, as it's hard to see exactly how the slices compare in size.

Audrey Harding
Audrey Harding

Over 65? Inactive? Why am I so tired then, whilst saving the state a fortune in care costs?

Chris Usher
Chris Usher

its more like being negative (ie saving) than neutral though, like invisible earnings they used to rabbit on about

Martin Lunnon
Martin Lunnon

Because you don't get paid for it. You're only "economically inactive", not "inactive full stop"

Chris Usher
Chris Usher

would be nice if they recognised unpaid caring responsibilities for children and parents, rather than lumping them all in the inactive category.