Political

Federal Board gives go ahead to major changes in how we run our party (updated)

My latest Federal Board report on the party website following our July meeting has now been updated with more information as additional details have been set. Here is the latest version, with thanks to all my colleagues on the Board and the staff team for what was a very constructive set of debates and decisions. We’ve also updated and expanded the information on the Federal Board page on the party website, including membership of the Steering Group.

We’re putting the party back on track so we can achieve the sort of successes in future that we all so desperately want, and that our country needs.

Problems with the current way of doing things make it harder for us to win elections and to give members a real say in what happens. This was one of the major conclusions from the Dorothy Thornhill election review, which called for major improvements in how the party runs its own affairs.

At our meeting this weekend, the Federal Board (FB) therefore agreed three major steps forward.

First, we agreed a dozen projects to tackle specific issues highlighted by the review and other experiences. These cover everything from fixing the problems with how our general election campaigns are chaired, through to strengthening our audit function so that problems can’t be swept under the carpet.

One project is to improve the accountability of the President. For example, if I was to go off the rails and completely lose the confidence of Board members, should they have the power to trigger a recall vote by party members? (I believe so, as it’s important that those in power can be properly held to account for their performance.)

Second, the Thornhill Review says we need to define much more clearly the roles of Leader, President and CEO. We’ve agreed a draft, which also sets out who else needs to be involved in key decisions, such as any future electoral pacts or major party messaging decisions.

The draft needs more work, especially to ensure the key roles of state parties are properly reflected. It will make sense to involve our new leader in discussions before we finalise it. But progress is encouraging.

Third, we’ve agreed to pilot until at least the end of this year a new, smaller Steering Group. At 43 in size, the Board is much larger than those in many other organisations we’re all familiar with. It’s not a great size to – for example – have detailed scrutiny discussions that stretch in a supportive way our CEO and the director team.

Therefore, the new Steering Group is 14 in size, made up from Board members. You can see who is on the group on the Board page. The Board has also agreed to delegate a significant batch of powers to the Steering Group. (These are listed at the end of this article.)

The new group will report back regularly to the full Board, who will also be able to call in any issue for its full consideration. I’ll also report back to all members on the new group’s meetings through this site.

There are lots of details to be ironed out – and refinements to make as we see what works. There are long-standing provisions in our rule book which mean we can run a pilot without needing rule changes at this stage. So we can start straight away without having to wait until a conference next spring at the earliest. We can be more flexible in that experimenting to find out what works best – before then encasing what we learn in less flexible rules.

If this new approach works, I’m sure we will want to make some formal rule changes in due course. For example, the federal party has many posts which are currently indirectly elected, some of which are on the Steering Group. There’s a good case that some could move over to direct election by party members, strengthening our democratic processes.

As we make all these changes to how your party is, we will be consulting with members, including in a session at our autumn virtual conference.

One of the other findings of the Thornhill Review was how poorly joined up the planning can be between different elements of the party. In particular, although party conference votes for a party strategy, there has then been little follow-up to use it to inform and guide our activity across the party. So, we are also going to be trying out in advance of conference a new virtual get-together for a large group of key postholders across the party. More details on that to come.

There’s also a webinar coming up in August with me and CEO Mike Dixon. We’ll be happy to take questions about this topic along with anything else that’s going on in the federal party.

Or you can send in feedback right now, by emailing me on president@libdems.org.uk.

List of powers delegated to the Steering Group
The powers delegated are those under the following Articles of the party’s constitution: 2.7 (election rules), 2.10(b) (constitutional amendments), 3.2(c) (overseas members), 3.2(d) (SAO/AO powers), 3.8 (overseas members), 3.9(a) (overseas members), 3.9(b) (data protection), 4.9-4.12 (overseas members), 9.5 (limited company, etc.), 9.6 (creating various party rules etc.), 11.1 (conference finances), 12.4 (borrowing powers), 18.4 (leadership election timetable), 20.6 (nominating officer appointment), 21.1-21.5 (party body recognition) and 23.3 (complaints process).

Want to hear more about what the Lib Dems are doing in Parliament? Sign-up for a weekly update here.

6 responses to “Federal Board gives go ahead to major changes in how we run our party (updated)”

  1. Sounds like a great open and accountable party with member involvement. Just need to all 2nd on the same hymn sheet and get the word out to voters. Sandwell Lib Dems are successful. Well I’m membership secretary.

    • Depending on who is elected as leader, the proportions of ethnicity will either be pretty much spot on the national average for the BAME population, or the group will be one short. Not something to be comfortable about, but rather more than just a nod. Likewise on age, there’s quite a big age range across the people – I don’t know if perhaps a couple of them are younger than you realise 🙂 Or is it older people you fear are under-represented?

  2. No mention yet of scrapping the English Party and disseminating its powers and funds to the Regions.? We really must promote the status of the Regions, and make sure that Regional officers foster or mentor the moribund or struggling areas and ensure that new members are slotted into a local group.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments and data you submit with them will be handled in line with the privacy and moderation policies.