Political

UKIP voters most likely to demand fictitious legislation be repealed

YouGov has repeated an illuminating piece of research carried out in the US, asking people if they think a fictitious piece of legislation (the Public Affairs Act of 1975) should be repealed and also seeing how people’s views vary if the repeal is associated with different parties.

Overall, the British public come out ok:

Some people say the Public Affairs Act 1975 should be repealed. Do you agree or disagree?
Agree: 9%
Disagree: 9%
Neither: 82%

(Overall, Brits seem less likely to have a view on imaginary legislation than Americans. Yay, go us.)

Unsurprisingly, the numbers budge a little if a party name is given:

Some Conservative politicians have called for the Public Affairs Act 1975 to be repealed. Do you agree or disagree?
Agree: 9%
Disagree: 16% (with Labour voters going from 11% in the first version to 24% in this version)
Neither: 75%

Some Labour politicians have called for the Public Affairs Act 1975 tobe repealed. Do you agree or disagree?
Agree: 9%
Disagree: 10% (with Conservative voters going from 10% in the first version to 23% in this version)
Neither: 81%

Most fun comes from the original question and its breakdown by party preference (though beware the samples are getting smaller as we do this). Overall 9% may want something that doesn’t exist to be repealed. For UKIP supporters that leaps up to 24% – and in so doing makes the point that to simply think of UKIP voters as Eurosceptics or hostile to immigration misses the wider picture.

It’s more accurate to think of UKIP voters as grumpy – with the world, with society, with government and with the current decade. And fearful of nuclear holocaust.

Undoing something, rolling back something, repealing something – it all fits with that outlook.

10 responses to “UKIP voters most likely to demand fictitious legislation be repealed”

      • MarkPack shinydan  Er – confused by both question and answer. Isn’t the “original question” the one to which you say above 24% of UKIP voters answered “yes”? Or if not, what?

      • Malcolm ToddMarkPackshinydanIf I’ve understood it correctly:
        When asked “Some people say the Public Affairs Act 1975 should be repealed. Do you agree or disagree?”, UKIP voters answered as follows.
        24% – Agree. 7% – Disagree. 69% – Neither.

  1. I wonder whether different dates for the Public Order Act would make a difference e.g. 1975, 1985, 1995, 2005, 2012 i.e. putting it squarely in different governments. Or you could just say The Public Order Act, passed when Tony Blair / Gordon Brown / Margaret Thatcher / John Major etc. was PM.

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